Search This Blog

Wednesday, 22 November 2017

Impact of decision to move European Medicines Agency to Amsterdam

As one of many consequences of Brexit, following a very close vote by member states on Monday 20th November, Amsterdam has been confirmed as the new home for the European Medicines Agency. On current plans, the EMA will be operating in Amsterdam from April 2019, following a likely shadow hosting of the EMA there for some months before the formal date for completing the move of the agency.

The EMA's Patients and Consumers Working Party annual meeting
Meantime the EMA's Patients and Consumers Working Party (PCWP) is holding its annual meeting with all EMA eligible patient/consumer consumer organisations to consider relocation preparedness, patient and consumer involvement in EMA activities, highlights from major EMA committees and updates on pharmacovigilance, information on medicines and future work programmes in 2018 and 2019 for the PCWP and the EMA's Healthcare Professionals Working Party.

Effective medicines have both powerful therapeutic actions as well as the potential for serious unwanted adverse effects. The EMA was founded in 1995 with initial funding from the European Union and the pharmaceutical industry, and further support from EU member states. The European Medicines Agency is concerned with regulation, supply chain and pharmacovigilance for medicines and other advanced therapies for 28 countries across the European Union - from the Baltic countries to Ireland and from Scandinavia to the Balkans and the Mediterranean. All these roles concern balancing benefits and risks when it comes to patient safety with regard to medicines.

The EMA has established mechanisms for involving patients in regulatory assessment: patients’ value perception and value systems. The EMA also has an increasing remit to engage with stakeholder organisations and to improve transparency in its activities for the ~510 million citizens of the European Union. Furthermore the EMA has a major role in educating patients, carers and health care professionals about medicines. There have for example been recent workshops on
  • combating antibiotic resistance: a partnership with the European Centre for Disease Control 
  • biosimilars
  • personalised medicine initiatives
  • applying big data to improved regulation of medicines in Europe which raises important questions about clinical utility, quality, accessibility and systems for data mining
There remain many decisions and actions for the coming months needed to ensure continuity of the EMA's business. These involve the smooth relocation of the EMA to Amsterdam and either developing systems to retain UK expertise for the EMA or replacing that expertise from other EU member states. For the EMA, priorities include:

  • minimising the impact on staff of the move to maximise staff retention
  • maintaining capacity to continue the work of the EMA 
  • the resulting need to prioritise EMA core and planned further activities
  • continuing productive engagement with stakeholder groups: patients, carers, healthcare professionals ...
  • maintaining the capacity of the EMA to engage with the public
For the UK, there are pressing questions regarding the future regulation of medicines in the UK post-Brexit, the impact of loss of international influence of UK regulators and other experts on medicines and the impact of loss of biotech and pharmaceutical companies from London to Amsterdam.

The EMA has been based in London for over 20 years. Many staff have strong family and other personal ties in the UK - for example partners' work, children at school, dependent relatives ...  Adapting to a new country is no simple matter. The working language of the EMA is currently English however full integration within Amsterdam will need competency in the native language in the Netherlands. There will also be practical challenges arising from the simultaneous impact of the arrival of up to 800 families on the Amsterdam housing market and schools system.


© Donald Singer 



Tuesday, 21 November 2017

Global perspectives on the heart: Hippocrates Book of the Heart launched in Toronto

The Hippocrates Book of the Heart edited by Wendy French, Michael Hulse and Donald Singer
ISBN 978-0-9935911-1-2   UK: £12  Ireland: €15  US: $18  CAN: $24  AUS: $24  NZ: $30


Order a printed copy of the book            Order the eBook


Art installation by Rochelle Rubinstein and Alisha Kaplan
This book, made possible by the generous support of the Cardiovascular Research Trust, brings together eighty contemporary poets of the English-speaking world and a dozen medical experts from around the globe to offer their perspectives on the heart.
Since ancient times, the heart has been understood as the seat of the emotions, of the will, even of the soul. Over time, a fuller medical understanding of the organ has gradually evolved too, with Harvey’s first complete account of the circulation of the blood and the heart’s role (1628) and Dr. Christiaan Barnard’s first successful heart transplant (1968) marking key moments in a history that has given us a much better understanding of our hearts – and how to ensure they stay healthy.
In compiling this book, the editors invited poets around the English-speaking world, both prominent and less well-known, to contribute poems about the heart, written from any perspective, whether clinical or fanciful, medical or metaphorical. Among the poets are Griffin Poetry Prize winners Roo Borson and David Harsent, Forward Prize winners Sean O’Brien, Hilary Menos and Nick Mackinnon, former New Zealand Poets Laureate Elizabeth Smither and C. K. Stead, former National Poet of Wales Gwyneth Lewis, and President of PEN International Jennifer Clement. They are joined by many other distinguished and rising poets, including Robert Gray, John Kinsella, Peter Goldsworthy, Stephen Edgar and Geoffrey Lehmann from Australia; Anna Jackson, Jenny Bornholdt and Chris Price from New Zealand; Grace Schulman, Rafael Campo, Matthew Thorburn, Debora Greger and Jeffrey Harrison from the US; Marilyn Bowering and Kenneth Sherman from Canada; Justin Quinn, Mary O’Donnell and John F. Deane from Ireland; and Jane Draycott, Philip Gross, Mimi Khalvati, Lawrence Sail and Penelope Shuttle from the UK.
Leading medical professionals whose practice and research has led them to a keen interest in the health of the heart contribute information and advice to the book. In clear, crisp mini-essays they illuminate the nature of heart disease, the key risk factors, the history of cardiac surgery, and the most important steps every one of us can take in trying to maintain a healthy heart. Our medical professionals, based in Russia, Finland, The Netherlands, France, the UK, Australia and Hong Kong, agree in their core message: maintaining a healthy heart is possible for every one of us, and is crucial to our overall health and well-being throughout our lives.
The result is that rare thing, a book that satisfies the Horatian dictum that writing should both delight and instruct.

Makom, Toronto, 16.11.17: 
Donald Singer, Ron Charach, Kenneth Sherman, Roo Borson, 
Kim Maltman, Ronna Bloom and Alisha Kaplan
The Canadian launch of the book was held at Makom in Toronto on Thursday 16th November. The programme included readings by Canadian poets Alisha Kaplan, Kenneth Sherman, Roo Borson and Kim Maltman. There was also a lively discussion panel on "More poetry: just what doctors and the public need?" In addition to the above poets the panel was joined by poet and psychotherapist Ronna and poet and psychiatrist Ron Charach, with a co-chairs: Alisha Kaplan and Donald Singer.

See more about the Toronto launch of the Heart book


Ronna Bloom is the author of 5 collections of poetry including The More (Pedlar Press, 2017). Her poems have been translated into Spanish and Bengali, recorded by the CNIB, and used in films, by architects, in education and health care. Her work appears in "Poetry is Public" and in the Toronto Public Library Poetry Map. She is currently Poet in Community at the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Sinai Health System in Toronto. In these roles she offers students, health care professionals, patients and visitors opportunities to articulate their experiences through reflective writing and poetry. A meditator and psychotherapist, she lives in Toronto. 

Roo Borson's work has received the Griffin Poetry Prize and the Governor General's Award. Her most recent book of poetry is Cardinal in the Eastern White Cedar (2017), published by McClelland and Stewart/Penguin Random House. With Kim Maltman, she writes under the pen name Baziju, whose first book, Box Kite, was published in 2016 by House of Anansi Press.

Ron Charach is a poet, essayist, novelist and practicing psychiatrist. Born in Winnipeg, he has lived in Toronto since 1980 with his wife Alice, who is also a psychiatrist and researcher. His medically related poems are featured in two world anthologies of physician poetry published by the University of Iowa Press, Blood & Bone and Primary Care. His most recent books of poetry are Forgetting the Holocaust and Prosopagnosia, the latter of which was published by Toronto’s Tightrope Books. His poetry draws from the twin streams of literature and the healing arts.

Alisha Kaplan: The daughter of a printmaker and a psychiatrist, Alisha is very interested in the convergence of art and medicine, and the healing possibilities of poetry. She is a Torontonian poet, an editor for Narrative Magazine, and the winner of the 2017 Hippocrates Prize in Poetry and Medicine. She taught creative writing at New York University, where she received an MFA in Poetry. Her writing has appeared in Fence, DIAGRAM, Carousel, PRISM, The New Quarterly, and elsewhere.

Kim Maltman is a poet and theoretical particle physicist who teaches mathematics at York University. A past winner of the CBC Prize for Poetry, he has published five solo collections of poetry and three collaborative books, including Introduction to the Introduction to Wang Wei, written under the pen name Pain Not Bread and published by Brick Books.

Born in Toronto, Kenneth Sherman is the author of three books of prose and ten books of poetry. His most recent publications are Wait Time: A Memoir of Cancer and the poetry collection Jogging with the Great Ray Charles.

Donald Singer and Michael Hulse co-founded the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine in 2009. Singer is a clinical pharmacologist who has published over 200 articles, chapters and books on medicines, on cardiovascular research, prevention and treatment, and public understanding of health. He is an editor and contributor to The Hippocrates Book of the Heart (Hippocrates Press, 2017). He co-authors the prescribing safety guide Pocket Prescriber (Taylor & Francis) now in its 8th edition since 2004. He is President of the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. He is also on the Executive Committee of the European Association of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Friday, 29 September 2017

Global threat of antibiotic resistance

The European Medicines agency, in partnership with the ECDC (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control), is holding a workshop on global challenges from antimicrobial resistance (AMR). 

Loss of effectivenss of powerful classes of antimicrobial treatment is a serious issue both for less developed countries and for very developed healthcare systems. These are interdependent. Cultural and medical tourism leads to rapid transmission of resistant micro-organisms across continents.

There are 3 major current approaches to tackling AMR: 
1. reducing selection pressure on microbes to reduce the chance of their developing AMR. This needs strategies to reduce overuse of antimicrobial medicines. 
2. reducing human/human and animal/human transmission microbes. This needs effective infection control measures
3. increasing the availability of new antibiotics through more R & D combined with limiting their use within evidence-based guidelines - ie effective antibiotic stewardship.

There needs to be an integrated approach combining a pipeline of effective new antimicrobial and careful stewardship of existing antimicrobials through their effective use. However from a recent international survey, 20% of the public who took part were unaware that overuse of antibiotics leads to antimicrobial resistance to treatment. Furthermore 44% were unaware that antibiotics are ineffective against colds and 'flu'.

The WHO has estimated that, without major global action, by 2050 there may be ~400,000 preventable deaths annualy in the European region alone, as a result of lack of effective antiobiotics for serious infections (Figure).

Martial Plantady from the European Commission opened the day by discussing the EU Action plan launched in 2011 and running until 2016 against the threats from antimicrobial resistance. He noted that many solutions were described within the plan however there remain major challenges to effective implementation of the Plan, including:
- widespread and worldwide antibiotic use for growth promotion in livestock
- resulting need to push strategy to ban antibiotic use in livestock beyond the EU
- availability of animal and human data across member states
- effective surveillance on appropriate and prudent use of antimicrobials in humans
Some solutions include 
- effective dissemination of guidelines on prudent use of antibiotics in animals and humans
- Antibiotic Awareness Days
- more effective coordination of R & D across industry and academic sectors on new antimicrobials, alternatives, vaccines and rapid diagnostic tests
- engagement with key health professional and patient stakeholder organisations
The new EU Action Plan on antibiotic resistance was published in June 2017, with 3 pillars supported by strengthened measures for infection prevention and control:
- making the EU Region a best practice region on AMR
- improving research and innovation
- shaping the global agenda on AMR

At the 68th World Health Assembly in May 2015, the World Health Assembly endorsed a global action plan to tackle antimicrobial resistance, including antibiotic resistance, the most urgent drug resistance trend. Carmen Pessoa da Silva from the WHO underlined the key point that if AMR remains unresolved, the global threat would be enormous both for human health as well as for the world economy. She summarised 5 key elements of WHO strategy against AMR.
1. improved awareness and understanding (annual WHO awareness week)
2. strengthen knowledge through surveillance and research 9WHO Global AMR Surveillance System - GLASS - further report due in Jan 2018 - 47 countries are fully enrolled - 25% of member states)
3. reduce incidence of infection
4. optimise use of anti-microbial medicines
5. ensure sustainable investment for R & D

The Pharmaceutical Group of the European Union represents the ~400,000 community pharmacists who dispense medicines for the ~500 million population of the European Union. Around 46 million people visit a community pharmacist every day in Europe.
James Wilkinson discussed efforts of the PGEU to educate community pharmacists and the public in rational use of antimicrobial medicines.

Monday, 10 April 2017

Poetry for mind, body and soul: shortlists announced for the 2017 Hippocrates Prize


Poets from Australia, Canada, Ireland, Singapore, the USA and the UK are among finalists for major awards in this year’s Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine

Shortlisted in the Health Profession category are Kathy D’Arcy from Cork, Ireland, who has worked as a doctor and youth worker, Medical Social Worker Iora Dawes from Mansfield in England, and respiratory physician Andrew Dimitri from Sydney, Australia, who is also a field doctor for the international humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. 

Competing for the top award in the Open category are poets Claire Collison from London, England, Rosie Jackson from Somerset in England and Alisha Kaplan from Toronto in Canada.

In the running for the £500 Young Poet Award are from the USA, Rachel Litchman, Michigan, Joyce Zhou, Illinois, and Erin O'Malley, Pennsylvania; from the UK Roberta Maia Sher, London and Izzy Wythe, Oundle; and from Singapore Vernon Yian.


The judges also agreed a record twenty-nine commendations in the Health Professional category, reflecting the high quality of entries, with a further sixteen poems commended in the Open category, from poets from around the world: the UK, Ireland, the USA, Canada, Australia, Singapore, the Philippines and Switzerland.

The winners will be announced at Harvard on Saturday 6th May at an international symposium on poetry and medicine. There is still time to register for the Awards ceremony and the symposium on 6th May and for the associated event at the Boston Museum of Fine Art on ‘Poetry and Training the Eye’ on Friday 5th May.

The Hippocrates Prize attracts health professionals and established poets alike, with entries this year from over 30 countries. This year, themes have ranged from illness in children to recovery from depression and from cancer to treating victims in conflict zones.

The judges for the 2017 Hippocrates Awards are paediatrician and Emmy Award-winning producer of ER, Neal Baer; celebrated poet and Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory at Harvard, Jorie Graham; Scottish Makar (National Poet) and novelist, Jackie Kay; and New York Professor of Psychiatry and poet, Owen Lewis. The Young Poet category (for writers aged fourteen to eighteen) was judged by New York writer and teacher Maya Catherine Popa.

Neal Baer observed: ”Here the ordinary becomes extraordinary. These poems relate with emotional depth and in fresh and compelling ways what it means to be healthy and sick."

Jorie Graham commented: “That so much raw suffering, clear-sighted understanding of the vicissitudes of fate, and the perhaps lucky accidents of medical knowledge, or chance, or compassion, could find their way through formal intelligence to these pages is barely short of a miracle. It is certainly a testament to the power of the imagination to heal, console, elegize and cry out against the terrible demands of life and destiny. It is hard to forget these voices once one inhabits their particular circumstances, their messages of belief and profound trust in the consolations of beauty.” 

Owen Lewis too was impressed by the skill and compassion shown in the poems: “As a poet and a physician, reading through the entries as one of the judges for this year’s Hippocrates Prize was a real page-turner. This exciting and moving array of poems speaks to the experiences of illness and health, of patient and healer. The poems are written with both immediacy and reflection, with craft and heart-felt expression.”

Scottish National Poet Jackie Kay said: “What an inspiring competition to be part of. The Hippocrates Prize is a mind, body and soul competition. One minute you’re reading a poem from a patient, the next a doctor, the next a nurse, the next a porter, the next a friend, the next a family member. One minute you’re reading a poem set in a standard hospital in the UK, the next a makeshift hospital in Syria. One minute you’re thinking about mental anguish and anxiety, the next death and cancer." 

She added: "The poems are powerful, funny, moving, inspiring, thought-provoking. They show us everything we have in common. They help us with grief and grieving. But above all they make us cherish life, our health, our minutes and our hours. I’d keep these poems about me as my companions. They radiate light.”

“I am very pleased to be supporting this year’s Hippocrates Prize for poetry and medicine,” said patron of the awards Professor Anthony Fretwell-Downing (pictured). “These international awards are an excellent way to encourage people from around the world to take an interest in their health through poetry, as shown this year by entries from over 30 countries. The poems resonate with my sense of creativity.”

The Hippocrates Prize and this year's awards symposium are supported by the healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust, philanthropist Professor Anthony Fretwell-Downing, the Hippocrates Initiative and the Arts and Humanities Initiative of Harvard Medical School.

With a prize fund of £6000 /~ USD 7500 for winning and commended poems, the Hippocrates Prize is one of the highest value poetry awards in the world for a single poem. In its 8 years, the Hippocrates Prize has attracted over 8000 entries from over 60 countries, from the Americas to Fiji and Finland to Australasia. 

Notes for editors

For more on the shortlisted poets and the 2017 Hippocrates Awards,
contact +44 7494 450 805 or +1 617 432 5693 or email hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com


The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.


Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Personalised Medicines: role of patients, consumers and health professionals


London, 14th - 15th March
The European Medicines Agency is hosting workshops for its Working Parties of  Patients', Consumers' and Health Professionals' organisations.

The 14th March workshop aims to create awareness among these organisations of how the work of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) relates to personalised medicines. 

The 15th March workshop provides updates on other EMA and relevant external acfivities including feedback on topic groups on Social Media and on Risk Minimisation from medicines, European Antibiotic Awareness, Action plans on Biosimilars, feedback from key EMA committees and synergies with other organisations.


Speakers included:  
- Sandra Kweder from the US Food and Drugs Administration, discussing  the US precision medicine initiative. She highlighted the need to personalise medicines with cancer a key driver - only 80% of patients estimated to respond better when individual genomic and proteomic information is available.

- briefings from EMA's Scientific Committees e.g.  PRAC chair June Raine discussing pharmacogenomics in pharmacovigilance e.g. preventing serious skin reactions to abacavir in HIV patients and limiting toxicity of anti-cancer agents e.g. 5-fluoro-uracil and capecitabine

- updates from research organizations e.g. Denis Lacombe from EORTC  (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) on changing clinical research pathways, very expensive drugs and data-driven healthcare from "-omics" to "economics".

- developing diagnostics and treatments for rare diseases e.g. from Julian Isla on improvind management of Dravet Syndrome - a rare, catastrophic, lifelong form of epilepsy that begins in the first year of life with frequent and/or prolonged seizures. 

- Ulrich Jäger from the European Haematology Association on health professional perspectives on precision medicine, including practical challenges to applying precision medicine within a typical 7-12 minute consultation.  

- Dominique Monnet from the ECDC [European Centre for DiseasePrevention and Control] reported on progress in developing European Antibiotic Awareness days, held annually on 18th November. The ECDC is mandated to monitor current and potential future risks to human health from communicable disease. Individual EU member states are responsible for risk management of established incidence of communicable diseases.

- Camille Vlaminckx and Rosa Gonzalez-Quevedo from the EMA discussed progress by its Biosimilars Working Party and plans for making information about biosimilars available to health professionals and the public.  Copy versions of original biotherapeutics are called called 'similar biological medicinal products' (biosimilars) by the European Medicines Agency in the European Union (EU). Guidance for developing of biosimilars is now available for 7 classes of medicines. The number of eligible biosimilars is increasing as originally developed biotherapeutics leave data/patent protection.

A 3rd annual stakeholder workshop on biosimilars is to be held on May 5th 2017, organised by the European Commission.  

- Michael Berntgen from EMA discussed areas of potential synergies between regulatory and HTA issues on the pre-marketing, market entry and post-marketing phases for medicines.

EMA will publish the presentations, video recording and a workshop report.                                                                                                             

Wednesday, 8 February 2017

1st March deadline for 2017 Hippocrates International Young Poets (age 14 - 18) Award for Poetry and Medicine

The annual Hippocrates International Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine is a £500 (~USD 630) award for a single unpublished poem in English of up to 50 lines on a medical theme.


It is open to anyone in the world aged 14 – 18.

Awards will be presented on Saturday 6th May 2017 at a ceremony at Harvard Medical School. Winning and commended poems in the Young Poets Prize are published in the annual Hippocrates Prize Anthology.

Poet and teacher Maya Catherine Popa from New York City will select the winner. 

Maya said: "It is wonderful that a major prize with this kind of international visibility aims to encourage young writers from around the globe to express their interest in the interface between poetry and medicine."

She added: "As a teacher of this age group, I am often amazed at the creativity, insight, and skill of young writers. I wish more prizes aimed to showcase and support these voices." 
maya-c-popa
Maya Catherine Popa

Prize co-founder Professor Donald Singer added: "The organisers are delighted that the healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust is once again supporting this prestigious international award for young poets.

The Cardiovascular Research Trust has as a major aim reducing preventable heart disease by educating young people about healthy lifestyle.

Since it was founded in 2012 by clinical professor Donald Singer and poet Michael Hulse, there has been interest in the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize from 15 countries, with winners and commended poets from Hong Kong, the UK, the USA and Canada.



Hippo Young Poets 2013-15
Previous Hippocrates Young Poet winners: Rosalind Jana (2013), Conor McKee (2014, Paris Thepmankorn (2015)

The winner in 2013 of the inaugural Hippocrates Young Poets Prize was Rosalind Jana from Hereford Sixth Form College in England, for her poem Posterior Instrumented Fusion for Adolescent Scoliosis.
The winner of the 2014 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize was Conor McKee from Sidney Sussex College at the University of Cambridge for his poem I Will Not Cut for Stone.
The winner of the 2015 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize was Parisa Thepmankorn from Rockaway, New Jersey, USA for her poem Intraocular Pressure.
The  winner in the 2016 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize was Catherine Wang from Hong Kong for her poem Six Pills.
r-catherine-wang_med-2
Catherine Wang: 2016 Hippocrates Young Poet winner
The Hippocrates Young Poets Prize is supported by healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust and run by the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine, which received the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts for its work on the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.
For further information about the Hippocrates international Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine and the Cardiovascular Research Trust, email hearthealthycharity@gmail.com or call +44 7494 450 805

Maya Catherine Popa is a writer and teacher in NYC. A 2015 Ruth Lilly finalist, she is the recipient of the Poetry Foundation Editor’s Prize for review. Her poetry appears in Tin House, Kenyon Review, Poetry London, and elsewhere. Her criticism and non-fiction appear widely, including in Poetry, Poets & Writers Magazine, PN Review, and The Huffington Post. Her chapbook, “The Bees Have Been Canceled,” is forthcoming from DIAGRAM New Michigan Press in the U.S., and Southword Editions in Ireland, in winter 2017.

Her awards include the Hippocrates Poetry Prize, 2nd place in the Magma Poetry Prize, 3rd Place in the Narrative N30B Prize, the Gregory O’Donoghue Competition, Parallel Universe Competition, and the Oxford Poetry Society Martin Starkie Prize. She holds an MFA from NYU and an Mst in Writing from Oxford University, where she was a Clarendon Scholar. She teaches at the Nightingale-Bamford school in New York City.

Deadline midnight 14th February for 2017 Hippocrates Open and Health Professional Awards for Poetry and Medicine


With 1 week to go to the midnight 14th February deadline, there have already been entries from 28 countries and 5 continents, from Australia and New Zealand to throughout the USA, for the Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine, which has an awards fund of £5,500 (~USD 7,500).

Click here to find out more about the Hippocrates Prize and to enter online.

In addition to the Awards Symposium at Harvard Medical School on Saturday 6th May, from 6.30pm Friday 5th May there will be a session at the Boston Museum of Fine Art (MFA) on "Poetry and Training the Eye" involving objects and paintings inspired by health and illness, followed by a Reception at the MFA, followed by the opportunity to stay on at the MFA to enjoy the collections.

The judges for the 2017 International Open and Health Professional Awards are Neal Baer, Harvard-trained American paediatrician and Emma-award winning ER producer, Pulitzer-Prize winning poet Jorie Graham; Scottish Makar (national poet) Jackie Kay; and Professor Owen Lewis, New York, USA.  The 2017 Hippocrates Young Poets Judge will be judged by poet Maya Catherine Popa, New York City, USA (see details about the judges).

In the UK, clinical pharmacologist and prize co-founder Donald Singer said: “We are delighted to have such a distinguished panel of poets and health professionals as judges for the 2017 Hippocrates Prize.”

Harvard physician and poet Rafael Campo added: “ The Arts and Humanities Initiative of Harvard Medical School is very pleased to be supporting this major international prize, and to be hosting the awards ceremony, which will for the first time be presented in the USA.”

The 2017 Hippocrates Awards are being organised in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Initiative of Harvard Medical School. The Awards will announced by the judges at a ceremony at the close of the 8th International Symposium on Poetry and Medicine, to be held at Harvard Medical School on Saturday 6th May 2017.

Now in its 8th year, the Hippocrates Prize has attracted over 8000 entries from around the world, from the Americas to Fiji and Finland to Australasia. All awards are for a single unpublished poem in English of up to 50 lines of verse on a medical theme.

The International Open category is open to anyone in the world to enter. There have been entries from over 60 countries since the Hippocrates Prize was launched in 2009, with winning poets from Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, the UK and the USA.

The International Health Professional category is open to any in the world who is a Health Professional  employees, a health student or working in a professional organisation or charity involved in education and training of health professional students and staff or in supporting the care of patients.

The international Young Poet category: anyone in the world may enter who is aged under 19 years and at least 14 years old on the date of the Awards (6th May 2017). This £500 (~690 USD) award was launched in 2012. The 2017 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine is supported by the healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust.

Notes for editors
For more on the Hippocrates Prize and the 2017 judges, contact +44 7494 450 805 or email hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com

The 2017 Hippocrates Prize is supported by:
UK philanthropist Anthony Fretwell-Downing.
The Arts and Humanities Initiative of Harvard Medical School.
The Healthy Heart Charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust, founded in 1996, which promotes research and education for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the heart and circulation.

Sunday, 5 February 2017

Enter for the Hippocrates International Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine


There is still time to enter for the 2017 Hippocrates International Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine is a £500 (~USD 630) award for a single unpublished poem in English of up to 50 lines on a medical theme. 
 
It is open to anyone in the world aged 14 – 18.


Healthy heart charity the CRT is supporting 2017 Hippocrates International Young Poets Award for Poetry and Medicine.

The healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust is delighted again to be supporting this prestigious international award for young poets: the CRT has as a major aim reducing preventable heart disease by educating young people about healthy lifestyle.

Maya Catherine Popa
Poet and teacher Maya Catherine Popa from New York City will select the winner. Awards will be presented on Saturday 6th May 2017 at a ceremony at Harvard Medical School. Winning and commended poems in the Young Poets Prize are published in the annual Hippocrates Prize Anthology.

Since it was founded in 2012 by clinical professor Donald Singer and poet Michael Hulse, there has been interest in the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize from 15 countries, with winners and commended poets from Hong Kong, the UK, the USA and Canada.

Catherine Wang: 2016 Hippocrates Young Poet winner
Previous Hippocrates Young Poet winners: Rosalind Jana (UK, 2013), Conor McKee (UK, 2014), Paris Thepmankorn (USA, 2015) and Catherine Wang (Hong Kong, 2016).

The Hippocrates Young Poets Prize is supported by healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust and run by the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine, which received the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts for its work on the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.

For further information about the Hippocrates international Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine and the Cardiovascular Research Trust, email hearthealthycharity@gmail.com or call +44 7494 450 805.

Maya Catherine Popa is a writer and teacher in NYC. A 2015 Ruth Lilly finalist, she is the recipient of the Poetry Foundation Editor’s Prize for review. Her poetry appears in Tin House, Kenyon Review, Poetry London, and elsewhere. Her criticism and non-fiction appear widely, including in Poetry, Poets & Writers Magazine, PN Review, and The Huffington Post. Her chapbook, “The Bees Have Been Canceled,” is forthcoming from DIAGRAM New Michigan Press in the U.S., and Southword Editions in Ireland, in winter 2017.

Her awards include the Hippocrates Poetry Prize, 2nd place in the Magma Poetry Prize, 3rd Place in the Narrative N30B Prize, the Gregory O’Donoghue Competition, Parallel Universe Competition, and the Oxford Poetry Society Martin Starkie Prize. She holds an MFA from NYU and an Mst in Writing from Oxford University, where she was a Clarendon Scholar. She teaches at the Nightingale-Bamford school in New York City.